Homework for 11th January 2018

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The homework set at the last meeting on the 23rd November was to do a blog entry.

Imagine you have a blog and create a blog piece about anything you want. Aim for ‘divine creativeness’. It could be something from your day or a recent event or just a random idea you want to share on your blog. Limit it to 200 words. Have it ready for the first meeting of 2018 on the 11th January.

To help you with this look at Kathleen Jones’ ‘A Writer’s Life‘ blog

The next meeting on the 14th December is a Read and Share starting at the normal time. It will finish a little early for the Christmas lunch at the Horse and Farrier, Threlkeld.

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Angela Locke writes

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24 November 2017

Dear fellow writers

An amazing session today. Thank you all of you who braved the weather to be there, though we did have some diminution in numbers because of the weather forecast. We explored the nature of writing, and where Art ends and technique/skill begins. The powerful tool of stream of consciousness writing produced some fantastic work, really inspiring from everyone. This is the raw material from which you will extract your refined product! I was conscious of how much good writing there is in this group – real talent, and so wonderful to listen to and explore, all memorable.

Colin Dixon will kindly send you homework, and although this is my last session this year I will see you, of course, after your Read and Share session in 3 weeks time, for our Christmas lunch! I’m looking forward to it very much.

Warmest good wishes

Angela xx

The Haunted Garden

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There is a garden behind a wall, where hollyhocks stand straight and tall
Lavender roams wild and free, ivy wraps round every tree
Maiden fern and meadow sweet weave a carpet at your feet
Flower heads embrace, entwine, Harlequin and Columbine
There is no bird song in the air, bees and butterflies take care
If you should ever stray near there, take the time to have a look
And see the babble in the brook
One thing you will never see, is my friend Mallory and me

Mary Younger

Storm

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A mandarin moon moves maleficently across the sun creating an eerie orange glow throughout the valley.

The wind sails in on a sea of white horses. Heads rearing, manes tossing, wildness of a bush fire reflected in their bulging eyes.

Trembling trees grow arms to hug and hold each other tight until the tempest passes.

In its wake a Whirling Dervish picks up its skirts, dances a fantastic fandango to the beat of the retreating horses’ hooves. During the dying throes of the dance the Dervish dips its head into its heart, diminishing in the dust.

Mary Younger

Meditation

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The quietude of evening post rush hour throng
The lull before a storm, a hushed dirty sky
The silence in a church when the choir stops its song
The parched empty bed where the river has run dry
Some stillness salves the soul
Becalms a troubled mind
The singing of the bowl
Serenity and Sound combined

Mary Younger

Homework for 23rd November 2017

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Write a completely unpunctuated piece (prose or poetry) and set yourself a strict 10 minute time limit to do this in. No capitals, full stops etc. It should be a stream of consciousness writing form relating to an event or moment in your day. Something that moved you during that day. Possibly seasonal.

Then write it again with full punctuation. Keep both versions.

Of Things Not Seen

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photo at pixabay

Chris had been really pleased when Jane telephoned and asked if she could stay with him for a week of the Easter vacation. She was doing her post graduate teaching qualification in Newcastle and they’d met six months earlier when he’d been doing his. Now he was in his probationary teaching year at Penrith’s Ullswater Boys’ School.

The early Spring sunshine through thin curtains woke Chris and he’d spent a couple of hours cleaning and tidying his rented cottage at Kitchenhill just outside Penrith. Later he met Jane’s train at Penrith station and she said she would like to see a lake. They’d driven down Ullswater, chatting easily, and carried on to Ambleside.

There they’d gone into a chintz and china tearoom owned by a striking woman of about fifty in a long dark skirt, bright green blouse, beringed fingers and dangly gold earrings. Chris noticed the earrings were sigil-like stars and crescent moons as she took their order. They also learned that her name was Mary and she’d previously owned the infamous ‘Jungle’ transport cafe on the A6 near Shap. She’d sold it three years earlier, just before the M6 had opened in 1970.

Mary had asked what they did and Jane told her. “You won’t ever teach” said Mary quietly to Jane. Jane’s brown eyes widened “Why do you say that?”

“I see things.” said Mary with a slight moue and an apologetic lift of her shoulders as she turned back to the kitchen.

Colin Dixon